News

Dr Rosy Daniel September 2021, News Bulletin

Dear Friends,

Welcome to my September news update with the pick of the most interesting stories in health and wellbeing over the last month. Please explore these new findings and be sure to share them with your friends, families and colleagues.

With warmest good wishes, – Dr Rosy Daniel

Further Reaches of Consciousness

Beyond The Brain 2021 – Further Reaches of Consciousness Research

Beyond the Brain is the world’s premier conference series exploring new research on whether and how consciousness and mind extend beyond the physical brain and body. This year’s event covers the limitations of scientific materialism, parapsychological research, implications of NDEs, savant syndrome, indigenous gateways to the soul and the nature of universal love. There will also be an experiential session on each day.

Read an extract from this Scientific and Medical Article

Nutrition

Why Migraine Sufferers May Want to Eat More Fish

For most of her life, Tanya Kamka suffered migraine headaches on a weekly basis. The headaches would usually come on gradually and then build, causing excruciating pain and pressure behind her left eye that would culminate in her vomiting or visiting the emergency room. The ordeal would often leave her feeling weak and exhausted for days afterward. “Anytime I had a migraine I’d be wiped out for three or four days,” said Ms. Kamka, 58, a post office clerk who lives near Fort Bragg, N.C. “I missed a lot of work because of migraines.”

Read the full NY Times article

Flavonoid-rich food could improve your gut microbiome and lower your blood pressure

A diet rich in flavonoid compounds is linked to lower blood pressure, a study has found, and the association is partly explained by an improved gut microbiome. Flavonoids are compounds found in plants. Foods rich in flavonoids include vegetables, fruits such as apples, pears and berries, and chocolate, tea and wine. In the body, they act as antioxidants, and provide protection from ultraviolet rays. They are broken down by the gut microbiome. “Our gut microbiome plays a key role in metabolising flavonoids to enhance their cardioprotective effects, and this study provides evidence to suggest these blood pressure-lowering effects are achievable with simple changes to the daily diet,” said Prof Aedín Cassidy at Queen’s University in Belfast, Northern Ireland, lead investigator of the study.

Click here to read the full Science Focus Article

Pain Management

NIH-funded study suggests a single skills-based session on pain management packs a punch

A single two-hour session of a pain management skills class could offer as much benefit as eight sessions of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for patients experiencing chronic low-back pain (CLBP), suggests a study published in JAMA Network Open. Supported by the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH) and the National Institute on Drug Abuse, both part of the National Institutes of Health, the study explored whether a compressed intervention could lead to the same benefits as a longer-course of CBT.

Read the full NCCIH Article

Cancer Stories 

Wind Catching Systems designs giant floating wind farm with 117 turbines

Norwegian company Wind Catching Systems is developing a floating offshore wind power generator that could produce renewable energy for 80,000 homes at prices comparable to traditional fossil fuels. Named the Windcatcher, the structure would contain more than a hundred rotors stacked vertically within a 300-metre-high framework. According to the company, one Windcatcher could produce as much energy as five of the strongest floating turbines in existence while halving the price of the energy generated in the process. Wind Catching Systems aims to deploy the first structure within the next three years. “Our goal is to enable offshore wind operators and developers to produce electricity at a cost that competes with other energy sources, without subsidies,” Wind Catching Systems CEO Ole Heggheim told Dezeen.

Read the full Dezeen Article 

‘It’s a miracle crop’: the pioneers pushing the powers of seaweed

In his new venture, Barrett has been mindful of the Indigenous uses of seaweed as a fertilizer, and devised a kelp-based soil amendment that home gardeners and golf courses can use on their plants rather than chemical-laden fertilizers. Describing kelp as the “ocean’s first regenerative crop”, Barrett believes that by localizing seaweed production in New York he can revive the stymied maritime industry. “Seafood import rates in the US are around 90%. Seaweed is more than 94%. We try to bring it all back to being more local,” said Barrett. He adds that most seafood and seaweed products go through upwards of 15 purveyors, and that he is trying “to get that chain of custody down to three hands: a farmer, the company and a consumer”.

Read the full Guardian Article

To see lots more exciting news and evidence go to www.health-e-learning.org.uk and see the health-e-information platform.

 Researcher – Sophie Daniel, Health and Wellbeing Trust 

Images bought from iStock Getty imageshttps://www.istockphoto.com

Dr Rosy Daniel August 2021, News Bulletin

Dear Friends,

Welcome to my August news update with the pick of the most interesting stories in health and wellbeing over the last month. Please explore these new findings and be sure to share them with your friends, families and colleagues.

With warmest good wishes, – Dr Rosy Daniel

Women’s Empowerment and Health

WHO pledges extensive commitments towards women’s empowerment and health

The World Health Organization announced multiple commitments to drive change for gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls in all their diversity at the Generation Equality Forum, held last week in Paris. The WHO commitments focused on ending gender-based violence; advancing sexual and reproductive health and rights; and supporting health workers as well as feminist movements and leadership.

Read an extract from this WHO Article

 

Sound Therapy

Sound research – Scientific innovations harness noise and acoustics for healing

From the original stethoscope, invented more than 200 years ago, to the fleeting chirp of gravitational waves, sound has reverberated throughout the history of technological and scientific advances. Today, the role of sound in science extends beyond the range of audible frequencies: Ultrasonic and other silent acoustic waves have made their way into researchers’ repertoire, helping them push the boundaries of conventional medicine and research.

Read the full Stanford article

Music and Health: Relating Target Engagement to Clinical Benefit—Biomarkers for Brain Disorders of Aging

This is the last of three meetings that are part of Phase I of a National Institutes of Health (NIH)/Foundation for the National Institutes of Health (FNIH) project to develop evidence-based music therapies for brain disorders of aging.This meeting will gather input from participants in the music therapy/music medicine, neuroscience, behavioral intervention development, clinical trial methodology, and patient advocacy/art organization communities.

Click here to read the full NCCIH Article

Carnegie UK – Collective Wellbeing

Gross Domestic Wellbeing: loosening GDP’s hold

GDP – Gross Domestic Product – appeared for a long time to have a stranglehold over debates on economic progress and society’s welfare. It’s been the single number that people most often turn to and quote at each other; it’s used to claim political success or berate political failure; and it’s used as the basis of comparisons between countries. Over the last decade or so, there has been a concerted attempt to break this stranglehold. I won’t go into all the reports that have been the waymarkers on this debate. If you’re interested, I suggest starting by Googling “Stigliz/Sen/Fitoussi”.

Read the full Carnegie Trust Article

Cancer Stories 

Mindfulness for Cancer course by Penny Brohn UK and NCIM Healthcare

Penny Brohn UK partnered with NCIM Healthcare to deliver mindfulness courses for cancer patients & supporters with funding from Macmillan. The eight-week mindfulness course is specially adapted for people experiencing stress, anxiety or low mood following a cancer diagnosis. The courses have made a real difference to people’s wellbeing and how they cope in everyday life.

Further details about the course

 

Reimagining survival – Better cancer diagnostics and treatments are in the works

Cancer is a disease of the ages. For 4,000 years, humans have noted its destructive effects. Hippocrates dubbed the enemy Karkinos, for crab, because cancerous tumors are often firmly embedded in normal tissue, surrounded by “legs” of snaking blood vessels that deliver nutrients and oxygen. Pervasive, invasive and deadly, cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States. We have only recently found the means to fight back. Chemotherapy and radiation first arrived in the mid-1900s; President Richard Nixon declared a war on cancer in 1971, establishing the National Cancer Institute and increasing research funding. We’ve seen a slow march forward with small but meaningful victories since.

Read the full Stanford Article

To see lots more exciting news and evidence go to www.health-e-learning.org.uk and see the health-e-information platform.

 Researcher – Sophie Daniel, Health and Wellbeing Trust 

Images bought from iStock Getty imageshttps://www.istockphoto.com

Dr Rosy Daniel July 2021, News Bulletin

Dear Friends,

Welcome to my July news update with the pick of the most interesting stories in health and wellbeing over the last month. Please explore these new findings and be sure to share them with your friends, families and colleagues.

With warmest good wishes, – Dr Rosy Daniel

Environmental Updates  

Dartington Trust: Educating a new generation of agroecological farmers

The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation advocates a widespread transition to agroecological farming in order to meet the 2030 Sustainable Development goals. But we can only achieve this if we change the way we educate the next generation of farmers and producers, writes  Regenerative Food and Farming lead, Caroline Aitken.

Read an extract from this Sustainable Food Trust Article

WHO joins the UN Decade on Ecosystem Restoration on World Environment Day

On the occasion of World Environment Day 2021, WHO has joined the UN Decade on Ecosystem Restoration, a partnership aimed at preventing, halting and reversing the degradation of our ecosystems and the diversity of life they sustain. WHO has joined the partnership as a collaborating agency, along with the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and a large number of partners. Ecosystem restoration can significantly contribute to supporting health and well-being by helping to regulate infectious diseases, supporting food and nutrition security, and contributing to climate mitigation and adaptation.

Read the full WHO article

Let’s make Britain energy independent

Moving to 100% green energy is essential if we’re going to beat the climate crisis. But it also has other benefits, helping countries across the world be self-reliant when it comes to the energy they need. Our founder, Dale Vince, outlined his vision for energy independence in the Daily Express newspaper as part of their Green Britain campaign. “Fighting the climate crisis is usually presented from a perspective of morality: our obligation to look after the planet, to think of future generations – or even polar bears.

Click here to read the full Ecotricity Article

Nutrition and Lifestyle Medicine 

Being vegetarian makes you less likely to develop cancer and heart disease, major study finds

Being a vegetarian makes you less likely to develop cancer and heart disease, a major new study has found. Scientists at the University of Glasgow analysed more than 177,000 adults in the UK to find out whether their dietary choice affected the level of disease markers in their bodies. They looked at 19 health indicators, known as biomarkers, in their blood and urine related to cancer, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes and kidney function, as well as liver, bone and joint health.

Read the full MSN Article

BANT welcomes the BJGP article on the ‘lifestyle medicine movement’ and opens the door to further discussions

BANT welcomes the British Journal of General Practice (BJGP) May 4th article on lifestyle medicine (1) and is encouraged by the acknowledgement of well-informed drivers validating this movement. “There are numerous drivers for lifestyle medicine. Our analysis does not aim to argue against the importance of these drivers as many of them are well informed”. Since its foundation in 1997, BANT, as a professional association, has been at the forefront of nutritional therapy (NT) and personalised nutrition in support of its nearly 3,500 members.

Read the full BANT Article

Gut to brain: Nerve cells detect what we eat

Nerve cells of the vagus nerve fulfill opposing tasks. The gut and the brain communicate with each other in order to adapt satiety and blood sugar levels during food consumption. The vagus nerve is an important communicator between these two organs. Researchers now took a closer look at the functions of the different nerve cells in the control center of the vagus nerve, and discovered something very surprising: although the nerve cells are located in the same control center, they innervate different regions of the gut and also differentially control satiety and blood sugar levels.

Read the full Science Daily Article

To see lots more exciting news and evidence go to www.health-e-learning.org.uk and see the health-e-information platform.

 Researcher – Sophie Daniel, Health and Wellbeing Trust 

Images bought from iStock Getty imageshttps://www.istockphoto.com

Dr Rosy Daniel June 2021, News Bulletin

Dear Friends,

Welcome to my June news update with the pick of the most interesting stories in health and wellbeing over the last month. Please explore these new findings and be sure to share them with your friends, families and colleagues.

With warmest good wishes, – Dr Rosy Daniel

Nutrition Against Disease

These Foods Have Natural Chemopreventive Properties

The greatest ally against chronic disease may be found in your everyday diet, from fresh, raw fruits and vegetables to popular beverages such as coffee and green tea. Food is life and this couldn’t be truer elsewhere than in disease prevention. An estimated 42% of all cancers, for one, may be prevented by diet and lifestyle alone. The numbers are likely to be even higher for some types of cancer. There’s increasing awareness of the power of food and herbs in preventing and helping to heal cancer.

Read the full Green Med Info Article

Meditative Practice and Cognitive Function

Meditative practice and spiritual wellbeing may preserve cognitive function in ageing

It is projected that up to 152 million people worldwide will be living with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) by 2050. To date there are no drugs that have a substantial positive impact on either the prevention or reversal of cognitive decline. A growing body of evidence finds that targeting lifestyle and vascular risk factors have a beneficial effect on overall cognitive performance. A new review in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, published by IOS Press, examines research that finds spiritual fitness, a new concept in medicine that centers on psychological and spiritual wellbeing, and Kirtan Kriya, a simple 12-minute meditative practice, may reduce multiple risk factors for AD.

Read the full Science Daily Article

Environment

Seaspiracy: Is the fishing industry killing our oceans?

Is it possible to eat seafood sustainably? This is the question at the heart of Seaspiracy, the new Netflix documentary about commercial fishing that has dominated headlines, sparked debate and stirred up controversy. Directed by newcomer Ali Tabrizi and produced by Kip Anderson, the well-known environmental filmmaker behind Cowspiracy (2014), Seaspiracy reaches the dramatic conclusion that no, it is not possible to eat seafood sustainably. Instead, Seaspiracy asks that we give up fish altogether to save our oceans. But is it as simple as that?

Read the full Sustainable Food Trust Article

Mental Health

WHO and UNICEF launch new tools for the promotion of adolescent mental health

The Helping Adolescents Thrive Toolkit, launched today, provides programmatic guidance for people working in the health, social services, education and justice sectors on how to implement strategies for adolescent mental health promotion and protection. The Toolkit covers the legal foundations required for such programmes to succeed, the features of environments that are conducive to the well-being of adolescents, what support should be provided to parents and other caregivers, and psychosocial interventions that work.

Read the full WHO Article

Why Nature is the theme for Mental Health Awareness Week 2021 Complementary Health Approaches

During long months of the pandemic, millions of us turned to nature. Our research on the mental health impacts of the pandemic showed going for walks outside was one of our top coping strategies and 45% of us reported being in green spaces had been vital for our mental health. Websites which showed footage from webcams of wildlife saw hits increase by over 2000%. Wider studies also found that during lockdowns, people not only spent more time in nature but were noticing it more.

Read the full Mental Health Foundation article

Mental health may play big role in recovery after a heart attack 

Young and middle-aged adults who reported severe psychological distress – such as depression or anxiety – after suffering a heart attack were more than twice as likely to suffer a second cardiac event within five years compared with those experiencing only mild distress, according to a study presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 70th Annual Scientific Session. The study is the first to comprehensively assess how mental health influences the outlook for younger heart attack survivors, according to the researchers.

Click here to read the full Science Daily Article

To see lots more exciting news and evidence go to www.health-e-learning.org.uk and see the health-e-information platform.

 Researcher – Sophie Daniel, Health and Wellbeing Trust 

Images bought from iStock Getty imageshttps://www.istockphoto.com

Dr Rosy Daniel May 2021, News Bulletin

Dear Friends,

Welcome to my May news update with the pick of the most interesting stories in health and wellbeing over the last month. Please explore these new findings and be sure to share them with your friends, families and colleagues.

With warmest good wishes, – Dr Rosy Daniel

Mental Health

Brain fog: how trauma, uncertainty and isolation have affected our minds and memory

Before the pandemic, psychoanalyst Josh Cohen’s patients might come into his consulting room, lie down on the couch and talk about the traffic or the weather, or the rude person on the tube. Now they appear on his computer screen and tell him about brain fog. They talk with urgency of feeling unable to concentrate in meetings, to read, to follow intricately plotted television programmes. “There’s this sense of debilitation, of losing ordinary facility with everyday life; a forgetfulness and a kind of deskilling,” says Cohen, author of the self-help book How to Live. What to Do.

Read the full Guardian Article

Nutrition

Pomegranate: Evidence-Based Benefits of This Antioxidant Superstar

Pomegranate, with its characteristic red arils, is small but mighty when it comes to substantial benefits to your health as a superfood. Pomegranate has been called an antioxidant superstar. In fact, researchers have confirmed that pomegranate has three times the antioxidant power of red wine and green tea. The antioxidant impact in pomegranate comes from compounds known as polyphenols.

Read an extract from this Green Med Info Article

The Menopause – Complementary Health Approaches

Menopausal Symptoms and Complementary Health Approaches

A number of studies and systematic reviews on complementary health approaches for menopausal symptoms have been published. There is limited evidence on the effects of mind and body practices for menopausal symptoms, but a few hold promise. Scientists have found little evidence that natural products, such as herbs and other dietary supplements, are helpful. The long-term safety of phytoestrogens such as soy, red clover, and flaxseed, has not been established.

Read the full WHO article

World Health Organization Updates 

New WHO Global Compact to speed up action to tackle diabetes

The World Health Organization’s  new Global Diabetes Compact aims to bring a much-needed boost to efforts to prevent diabetes and bring treatment to all who need it  ̶  100 years after the discovery of insulin. The Compact is being launched today at the Global Diabetes Summit, which is co-hosted by WHO and the Government of Canada, with the support of the University of Toronto. During the event, the President of Kenya will join the Prime Ministers of Fiji, Norway and Singapore; the WHO Global Ambassador for Noncommunicable Diseases and Injuries, Michael R. Bloomberg; and ministers of health from a number of countries as well as diabetes experts and people living with diabetes, to highlight the ways in which they will support this new collaborative effort.

Click here to read the full World Health Organization Article

How the energy industry impacts the environment

In Texas, the energy industry plays an important role, particularly when it comes to green energy. Because of the prominence coal, oil, and renewable energy play in the Lone Star State, concerns over CO2 emission levels are equally important. Burning fossil fuels and producing cement account for about two-thirds of all carbon dioxide (CO2) and industrial methane released into the atmosphere since 1854. Although the U.S. has cut more CO2 emissions than any other nation and is on pace to meet a 2009 pledge to reduce CO2 emissions by 17% (from 2005 levels) this year, global carbon dioxide emissions have still reached the highest point in human history.

Read the full World Health Organization Article

Breast Cancer Initiative

New global breast cancer initiative highlights renewed commitment to improve survival

A major new collaborative effort, the Global Breast Cancer Initiative, is being introduced today by the World Health Organization, with the objective of reducing global breast cancer mortality by 2.5% per year until 2040, thereby averting an estimated 2.5 million deaths.  In recognition of International Women’s Day, WHO is hosting an advocacy event “Hearing the call of women with breast cancer” during which the new Initiative will be presented to the global cancer community.

Read the full NCCIH Article

To see lots more exciting news and evidence go to www.health-e-learning.org.uk and see the health-e-information platform.

 Researcher – Sophie Daniel, Health and Wellbeing Trust 

Images bought from iStock Getty imageshttps://www.istockphoto.com

Dr Rosy Daniel April 2021, News Bulletin

Dear Friends,

Welcome to my April news update with the pick of the most interesting stories in health and wellbeing over the last month. Please explore these new findings and be sure to share them with your friends, families and colleagues.

With warmest good wishes, – Dr Rosy Daniel

Complementary Therapies

Laying the Foundation: Defining the Building Blocks of Music-Based Interventions

The National Institutes of Health (NIH), in collaboration with the Foundation for the NIH and the Renée Fleming Foundation, are sponsoring an expert panel discussion—the first in a series of three meetings intended to develop evidence-based music therapies for brain disorders of aging. The roundtable format will be used to gather input from individuals representing neuroscience, music therapy and music medicine, behavioral intervention development, clinical trial methodology, and patient advocacy and art-based organizations. 

Click here to read the full National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health Article

Psychedelic therapy could ‘reset’ depressed brain

A powerful hallucinogenic drug known for its part in shamanic rituals is being trialled as a potential cure for depression for the first time. Participants will be given the drug DMT, followed by talking therapy. It is hoped this could offer an alternative for the significant number of people who don’t respond to conventional pills for depression. Psychedelic-assisted therapy might offer longer-term relief from symptoms, some researchers believe. A growing body of evidence indicates other psychedelic drugs, particularly alongside talking therapy, are safe and can be effective for treating a range of mental illnesses.

Read the full BBC Article

Nutrition

The right ‘5-a-day’ mix is 2 fruit and 3 vegetable servings for longer life

Higher consumption of fruits and vegetables is associated with a lower risk of death in men and women, according to data representing nearly 2 million adults. Five daily servings of fruits and vegetables, eaten as 2 servings of fruit and 3 servings of vegetables, may be the optimal amount and combination for a longer life. These findings support current U.S. dietary recommendations to eat more fruits and vegetables and the simple public health message ‘5-a-day.’

Read the full Science Daily article

Positive Environmental News 

Good vibrations: bladeless turbines could bring wind power to your home

The giant windfarms that line hills and coastlines are not the only way to harness the power of the wind, say green energy pioneers who plan to reinvent wind power by forgoing the need for turbine towers, blades – and even wind. “We are not against traditional windfarms,” says David Yáñez, the inventor of Vortex Bladeless. His six-person startup, based just outside Madrid, has pioneered a turbine design that can harness energy from winds without the sweeping white blades considered synonymous with wind power.

Read the full Guardian Article

How the energy industry impacts the environment

In Texas, the energy industry plays an important role, particularly when it comes to green energy. Because of the prominence coal, oil, and renewable energy play in the Lone Star State, concerns over CO2 emission levels are equally important. Burning fossil fuels and producing cement account for about two-thirds of all carbon dioxide (CO2) and industrial methane released into the atmosphere since 1854. Although the U.S. has cut more CO2 emissions than any other nation and is on pace to meet a 2009 pledge to reduce CO2 emissions by 17% (from 2005 levels) this year, global carbon dioxide emissions have still reached the highest point in human history.

Read the full SaveOnEnergy Article 

Breast Cancer Initiative

New global breast cancer initiative highlights renewed commitment to improve survival

A major new collaborative effort, the Global Breast Cancer Initiative, is being introduced today by the World Health Organization, with the objective of reducing global breast cancer mortality by 2.5% per year until 2040, thereby averting an estimated 2.5 million deaths.  In recognition of International Women’s Day, WHO is hosting an advocacy event “Hearing the call of women with breast cancer” during which the new Initiative will be presented to the global cancer community.

Read an extract from this WHO Article

To see lots more exciting news and evidence go to www.health-e-learning.org.uk and see the health-e-information platform.

 Researcher – Sophie Daniel, Health and Wellbeing Trust 

Images bought from iStock Getty imageshttps://www.istockphoto.com

Dr Rosy Daniel March 2021, News Bulletin

Dear Friends,

Welcome to my March news update with the pick of the most interesting stories in health and wellbeing over the last month. Please explore these new findings and be sure to share them with your friends, families and colleagues.

With warmest good wishes, – Dr Rosy Daniel

Emotional Well-Being 

NIH networks to advance emotional well-being research

Five new research networks totaling $3.13 million in funding from the National Institutes of Health will allow investigators to refine and test key concepts that advance the study of emotional well-being. Emotional well-being has been defined as an overall positive state of one’s emotions, life satisfaction, sense of meaning and purpose, and ability to pursue self-defined goals. The opportunity to research emotional well-being and its core components—a sense of balance in emotion, thoughts, social relationships, and pursuits—aligns with NIH’s broader objectives of fostering health promotion and disease prevention. For example, having a sense of purpose in life has been shown to reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke.

Click here to read the full NIH Article

What Are the Benefits of Fish Oil for Depression?

More than 17 million adults had an episode of depression in 2017 (the most recent data available), according to the National Institute of Mental Health. Right now, the strain on mental health is only getting worse, according to a study published in September 2020 in JAMA Network Open; people reported symptoms of depression at three times the rate they did before the pandemic. And while there’s no one-size-fits-all approach guaranteed to ease depression, the good news is that researchers know a lot about what works to help with symptoms (including sadness, hopelessness, and an inability to enjoy the things you once did). 

Read the full Everyday Health Article

Breast Cancer World Health Organization Update

Breast cancer now most common form of cancer: WHO taking action

The global cancer landscape  is changing, according to WHO  experts, on the eve of World Cancer Day 2021. Breast cancer has now overtaken lung cancer as the world’s mostly commonly-diagnosed cancer, according to statistics released by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) in December 2020. So on World Cancer Day, WHO will host the first of a series of consultations in order to establish a new global breast cancer initiative, which will launch later in 2021. 

Read the full WHO article

Environment 

Magnets, vacuums and tiny nets: the new fight against microplastics

When it comes to microplastics, there’s rarely good news. Researchers continue to find the tiny plastic fragments everywhere they look. Microplastics have been found in rain, Arctic ice cores, inside the fish we eat, as well as in fruit and vegetables. New research suggests 136,000 tons of microplastics are ejected from the ocean each year, ending up in the air we breathe. They are in human placentas, our wastewater, and our drinking water.

Read the full Guardian Article

Meeting climate goals ‘would save millions of lives every year’ through shift to healthier and greener diets

Taking tougher action to meet the world’s climate goals could save millions of lives each year, a new study finds. This is because more stringent action on greenhouse gases would come with knock-on benefits for human health, researchers said. For example, stronger climate policies would see the wider adoption of greener and healthier diets and drive reductions in harmful air pollution. Shifts towards climate-friendly diets, including less meat and dairy and more fruit and vegetables, would by far provide the largest co-benefits for health, the study suggests.

Read the full Independent Article

The value of biodiversity

The recently launched Dasgupta Review on the Economics of Biodiversity is a landmark report detailing the financial implications of the degradation of our biodiversity all over the world, due almost entirely to our pursuit for economic growth, with no regard for its impact on the health of our natural ecosystems. The review highlights the central role that biodiversity plays, not only in providing ecosystem services – the benefits provided to humans by healthy natural environments,  which have been valued globally at approximately $125 trillion p.a. (significantly higher than current global Gross Domestic Product (GDP) of roughly $80 trillion) – but also as a key part of the climate change solution.

Read an extract from this Sustainable Food Trust Article

To see lots more exciting news and evidence go to www.health-e-learning.org.uk and see the health-e-information platform.

 Researcher – Sophie Daniel, Health and Wellbeing Trust 

Images bought from iStock Getty imageshttps://www.istockphoto.com

Dr Rosy Daniel February 2021, News Bulletin

Dear Friends,

Welcome to my February news update with the pick of the most interesting stories in health and wellbeing over the last month. Please explore these new findings and be sure to share them with your friends, families and colleagues.

With warmest good wishes, – Dr Rosy Daniel

COVID-19 News

Lost touch: how a year without hugs affects our mental health

2020 has been challenging, and COVID-19 has dominated our headlines for much of the year. But away from the pandemic, the world of health and medicine has continued to deliver fresh research, new treatments for old diseases, and surprising developments that will affect our health next year. Articles including ‘Honeybee venom kills aggressive breast cancer cells’, ‘2nd person cured of HIV thanks to stem cell transplant’, ‘Could AI replace the finger prick blood sugar test?’

Click here to read the full Guardian Article

Vitamin D: Good for Health, Fights COVID-19

Vitamin D is an essential nutrient, and recent research has suggested it may also help guard against severe COVID-19. But how much is enough, and how hard is it to get the right amount of vitamin D? “We know that a large percentage of the population has suboptimal levels of vitamin D. In fact, as many as half of the U.S. population may be deficient in vitamin D,” said Kristin Gustashaw, clinical dietitian at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago.

Read the full National MedicineNet Article

Sugar: The Gut-Wrenching Truth

For years, researchers have suspected that the typical Western diet plays a leading role in the high rates of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) observed in industrialized countries around the world. But what exactly about the Western diet — high in fat, animal protein, and sugar, and low in vegetables, legumes, whole grains, and fruit — is to blame? While fat and animal protein have traditionally been considered the prime suspects, a growing number of studies now point to sugar as a leading culprit.

Read the full Everyday Health article

Complementary Health & Smoking

Complementary Health Approaches for Smoking Cessation

There has been emerging interest in the use of complementary therapies such as hypnotherapy, yoga, or mindfulness meditation to aid in smoking cessation. To date, several of these interventions have shown some promise in preliminary, non-randomized studies, but there is not enough evidence to establish if mind and body practices are as efficacious as other evidence-based smoking cessation treatments.

Read the full National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health Article

Environmental News

Standing in solidarity with farmers in India

I am embarrassed to admit that it wasn’t until watching a session at the recent ORFC that I became fully aware of the farmers’ protests that have been happening in India. The protests have not had the media attention they deserve as the world continues to struggle with the ongoing pandemic and the dangerous and disruptive run-up to the inauguration of a new American President that dominated the news for the past few weeks. 

 

Read the full Sustainable Foot Trust Article

Health Benefits of Yoga and Meditation

Can Yoga and Meditation ward off Alzheimer’s disease?

We’re all used to hearing that a course in yoga and meditation can make you feel better. Help you cope with stress. Now a new study headed by Helen Lavretsky of UCLA and published in the May edition of the Journal of Alzheimer’s Research indicates yoga and meditation may also forestall the cognitive impairment that often precedes the development of Alzheimer’s disease. The study involved 12 participants who over 12 weeks performed kundalini yoga and Kirtan Kriya meditation. 

Read an extract from this The Scientific & Medical Network Article

To see lots more exciting news and evidence go to www.health-e-learning.org.uk and see the health-e-information platform.

 Researcher – Sophie Daniel, Health and Wellbeing Trust 

Images bought from iStock Getty imageshttps://www.istockphoto.com

Dr Rosy Daniel January 2021, News Bulletin

Dear Friends,

Happy New Year! And welcome to my January news update with the pick of the most interesting stories in health and wellbeing over the last month. Please explore these new findings and be sure to share them with your friends, families and colleagues.

With warmest good wishes, – Dr Rosy Daniel

Positive News Stories from 2020

The Recovery Room: The best non-pandemic stories of 2020

2020 has been challenging, and COVID-19 has dominated our headlines for much of the year. But away from the pandemic, the world of health and medicine has continued to deliver fresh research, new treatments for old diseases, and surprising developments that will affect our health next year. Articles including ‘Honeybee venom kills aggressive breast cancer cells’, ‘2nd person cured of HIV thanks to stem cell transplant’, ‘Could AI replace the finger prick blood sugar test?’

Click here to read the full Medical News Today Article

Nutrition

Too Much Sugar Linked to Aggression, ADHD and Bipolar Disorder

Discover the bitter truth about high-sugar diets, particularly in how they may be triggering ADHD and aggressive behaviors by overactivating the fructose pathway, a mechanism nature may have intended to be used for energy storage and survival. Yet another research study confirms the link between attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), bipolar disorder and aggressive behaviors with sugar intake.

Read the full Green Med Info Article

‘Food for Thought’: Reflections on an organic life

Phil Haughton is old friend of mine, best known as the founder of three Bristol food shops flying under the banner of The Better Food Company. I wanted to say a few words about his book, Food for Thought, which ‘celebrat[es] the joy of eating well and living better’. I much admire the man and all his achievements, particularly in Bristol, where he virtually pioneered the concept of a wholly organic food shop, but also because I knew that amongst his formative influences was a period when he lived in a commune in southwest Scotland.

Read the full Sustainable Food Trust Article

Integrated Approach to Brain Health

Iceland joins forces with WHO to support an integrated approach to brain health

His Excellency Mr Harald Aspelund, Ambassador of the Permanent Representative of Iceland to the United Nations Office and other International Organizations in Geneva and Ms Jane Ellison, WHO Executive Director for External Relations and Governance signed a new contribution agreement to support work towards integrated brain health, that will be led by a newly established unit within the Department of Mental Health and Substance Use.

Read the full World Health Organization Article

Environmental Health

An Action Plan for Greener Prisons

A new report published by the Sustainable Food Trust’s Harmony Project recommends that prisons in the UK should provide more opportunities for inmates to connect with the natural world with the goal of improving the wellbeing of staff and prisoners and supporting rehabilitation. ‘An Action Plan for Greener Prisons’ draws on research which indicates that access to the natural world, such as having the opportunity to grow food and work with animals, can improve mental wellbeing and reduce stress, anxiety and depression.

Read the full Sustainable Foot Trust Article

Environmental impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, as observed from space

COVID-19 has changed the way we live and work, as various health and safety restrictions keep more of us at home more often. The resulting changes to our behavior are already impacting the environment around us in myriad ways, according to comparisons of remote sensing data before and during the pandemic collected by NASA, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and ESA (European Space Agency) Earth-observing satellites and others.

Read an extract from this Science Daily Article

To see lots more exciting news and evidence go to www.health-e-learning.org.uk and see the health-e-information platform.

 Researcher – Sophie Daniel, Health and Wellbeing Trust 

Images bought from iStock Getty imageshttps://www.istockphoto.com

Dr Rosy Daniel December 2020, News Bulletin

Dear Friends,

Welcome to my December news update with the pick of the most interesting stories in health and wellbeing over the last month. Please explore these new findings and be sure to share them with your friends, families and colleagues.

With warmest good wishes,

Dr Rosy Daniel

Coronavirus (COVID-19) 

Renewable energy defies Covid-19 to hit record growth in 2020

Global renewable electricity installation will hit a record level in 2020, according to the International Energy Agency, in sharp contrast with the declines caused by the coronavirus pandemic in the fossil fuel sectors. The IEA report published on Tuesday says almost 90% of new electricity generation in 2020 will be renewable, with just 10% powered by gas and coal. The trend puts green electricity on track to become the largest power source in 2025, displacing coal, which has dominated for the past 50 years. Growing acceptance of the need to tackle the climate crisis by cutting carbon emissions has made renewable energy increasingly attractive to investors. The IEA reports that shares in renewable equipment makers and project developers have outperformed most major stock market indices and that the value of shares in solar companies has more than doubled since December 2019.

Click here to read the full Guardian Article

More than 2.5m people in England to get free vitamin D

More than 2.5 million people in England are to be offered a free supply of vitamin D by the government, officials have said. Care homes in England will automatically receive supplies of the supplement for their residents in plans announced on Saturday. People on the clinically extremely vulnerable list will be sent a letter offering them the chance to opt in for a supply to their homes. The free deliveries will start in January, providing four months’ worth of vitamin D to up to 2.7 million people.

Read the full College of Medicine Article

Exercise and Health

Every move counts towards better health – says WHO

Up to 5 million deaths a year could be averted if the global population was more active. At a time when many people are home bound due to COVID-19, new WHO Guidelines on physical activity and sedentary behaviour, launched today, emphasize that everyone, of all ages and abilities, can be physically active and that every type of movement counts. The new guidelines recommend at least 150 to 300 minutes of moderate to vigorous aerobic activity per week for all adults, including people living with chronic conditions or disability, and an average of 60 minutes per day for children and adolescents. WHO statistics show that one in four adults, and four out of five adolescents, do not get enough physical activity.  Globally this is estimated to cost US$54 billion in direct health care and another US$14 billion to lost productivity.

 

Read the full World Health Organisation article

Cancer Research Updates

Study of “exceptional responders” yields clues to cancer and potential treatments

In a comprehensive analysis of patients with cancer who had exceptional responses to therapy, researchers have identified molecular changes in the patients’ tumors that may explain some of the exceptional responses. The results demonstrate that genomic characterizations of cancer can uncover genetic alterations that may contribute to unexpected and long-lasting responses to treatment, according to the researchers. The results appeared in Cancer Cell on Nov. 19. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health, conducted the study in collaboration with investigators from other institutions, including NCI-designated Cancer Centers.

Read the full National Cancer Institute Article

Complementary and Natural Healthcare 

CNHC exhibit at The Integrative Health Convention

On Saturday 5 and Sunday 6 October CNHC exhibited at the Integrative Health Convention which took place in London at the Park Plaza Hotel. Dr Michael Dixon opened the event and discussed many ways that integrated healthcare can benefit patients through programmes such as social prescribing or personal health budgets. He explained that an approach to integrative healthcare provides more personalised care, addresses inequalities and increases social capital and the potential for a health creating community. Across the two-day convention there were four CNHC registrants who presented, speaking on Massage Therapy, Reflexology and Reiki.

Read the full CNHC Article

 

Dietary Supplements and Cognitive Function, Dementia, and Alzheimer’s Disease

Concerns about forgetfulness and whether it is the first sign of Alzheimer’s disease are common, particularly among older patients. Your patients may also ask questions about use of dietary supplements, which are often marketed with claims that they enhance memory or improve brain function and health. This issue of the digest summarizes current information on what the science says about several dietary supplements that have been studied for cognitive function, dementia, and Alzheimer’s disease. Although a few trials of natural products for the prevention of cognitive decline or dementia have shown some modest effects, direct evidence is lacking.

Read an extract from this Science Daily Article

To see lots more exciting news and evidence go to www.health-e-learning.org.uk and see the health-e-information platform.

 Researcher – Sophie Daniel, Health and Wellbeing Trust 

Images bought from iStock Getty imageshttps://www.istockphoto.com

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